Friday, 10 May 2013

Hot Weather Spells Trouble


It was warm in London when the CAMRA Rochdale, Oldham and Bury mob visited, led by that most intrepid of topers, Tyson himself.  They arrived on Friday, but I was a bit of an advance guard, having come down the night before from my mother's place in Scotland, to get a bit of rest beforehand.  Naturally that rest included a schlep to Camden Brewery for the launch of Mark Dredge's new book, where I enjoyed Camden Pale and Hell, didn't think much of American Hell and loved, as much as I've liked any beer this year, a one off Kiwi Wit, which reminded me very much of  Schneider Hopfenweisse, but was better to drink and at a more swoopable 5 per cent.   They seriously ought to think of bringing this out, even as an occasional special. I also renewed acquaintance with fellow bloggers and beer writers and met a couple more that I had either not met, or had met only briefly.  A really good night was had, marred only by a chicken kebab from round the corner from our flat.  A bad decision made worse by a forseeable outcome!  More of foreseeable outcomes later.

Friday was a glorious day as I walked to meet the thirsty Northerners at the Euston Tap. It all augured well as I observed no less than three Mallinsons beers on tap.  My request for a sparkler was met with an odd remark from the barman "I don't like sparklers on pale beer" quoth he hovering with the offending article in his mitt, but not applying it.  "Just as well you aren't drinking it then" I responded. "Sparkler please." Remember bar staff, it isn't your job to make judgements here.  Someone that specifically requests a sparkler in a place that provides the option is unlikely to be persuaded out of it.  Still, all was well with the beer here, as I have always found it to be. It was a good day beer-wise on Friday, with only the Parcel Yard needing to dial down the cellar temperature by a couple of degrees, though frankly, one or two others were on the edge.  (If in doubt, make it slightly colder. Beer always warms up. It never cools down.)

Saturday was similar temperature wise in the two pubs we visited on the official crawl.  Maybe, for Northern tastes at least, slightly (and arguably) on the edge in Craft Islington and too warm and flat in the Union Tavern, so E and I baled out to the sanity of the Old Red Cow, which is rapidly becoming a favourite and which serves cool beer and has a lot of cool people in it. And me.

I do worry continually about quality of cask beer, but more so in London which is a whole lot warmer than the North and which already suffers from a serious over-venting problem.  As it gets hotter, the beer quality gets worse as cellars either haven't got the kit to cool the beer, or are being incorrectly set.

Apart from a few trusted places,  come summer in London, this cask man will be haunting a few more Sam's pubs for Pure Brewed Lager. That's my other foreseeable outcome.


Pictured is the Fox and Anchor at Smithfield Market. Another new favourite and some rather flat looking beer bought on Saturday near a canal.


7 comments:

Curmudgeon said...

Don't know about London, but around here the Sam's pubs also seem to have proper cellar cooling for OBB.

Jay Krause said...

The Old Red Cow looks good. Will have to check that out next time. Agreed about dispense. It's all down to personal taste.

Tandleman said...

Jay: The problem about warm beer is that it doesn't just affect temperature, it affects condition. CO2 is less soluble in warm liquids. As you know.

The Old Red Cow is also handy for the Fox and Anchor.

Cooking Lager said...

"I do worry continually about quality of cask beer"

Only worry about the things within your control, old chap. The rest are the problems of others.

Then abdicate responsibility for all you can to minimise what is in your control.

Cooking Lager said...

Oh and Taddy lager is a better bang per buck down Sams and less like that proper lager and more a genuine cooking lager,

geordiemanc said...

Jay,
Although have not been in it since last summer, would second Tandie's recommendation of the Old Red Cow.

Benjamin Nunn said...

I might court some controversy here, but I think craft keg is *partly* to blame for cask being served too warm in certain beer-geeky pubs.

There are some in the trade who think - 'cask drinkers prefer it warmer, if people want something cold they can have keg' and actively ensure that their cask beer is several degrees warmer than the keg.

(As somebody who prefers cask AND cold, this is a frustrating stereotype but it can't be denied that there are many for whom this is the case).

The original Clerkenwell Craft Beer Co always get it right for my money though. Cask beers nicely cooled. (This isn't so true in the Islington and Brixton branches unfortunately).